Humanitarian Mission to The Amazon Basin!!

Ericka Orenstein Start Date: May 6, 2016 - End Date: Nov 21, 2016
  • Cultural Exchange
  • Educational/Research Trip
  • Volunteer Trip
  • Peru
  • Amazonas, Peru
  • Lima, Peru
  • Cusco, Peru
  • Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Peru
  • Aguas Calientes, Cusco, Peru

My Travel Story

by: Ericka Orenstein Start Date: May 6, 2016 - End Date: Nov 21, 2016
  • Cultural Exchange
  • Educational/Research Trip
  • Volunteer Trip
The Amazon Rainforest. It is also home to over 20 million people including hundreds of indigenous peoples, some of which have never been contacted by the 'outside world'. It holds 30% of our animal species and over 40,000 plant species! The Amazon stores 80 to 120 billion tonnes of carbon, helping to stabilize the planet's climate.

But climate change is a fight in progress, and it's up to us to protect what we have left!

The native people of the Amazon are our BEST protectors of these lands.

Not only is the destruction of our environment going to impact the world's climate but many people living in the Amazon witness environmental destruction that impacts their lives and their well-being, through no fault of their own, but they often lack the means and support to speak out against this.

We can change that.

The Munduruku are fighting a massive hydroelectric project – the São Luiz do Tapajós mega dam – along the Tapajós River in the Amazon Rainforest that would displace entire villages and destroy livelihoods. As Munduruku leader Adalto Jair Munduruku explains, “We journeyed here to speak to the leadership of GE and meet those that would consider profiting off the displacement of thousands of people from our traditional lands against our will, destroying our natural environment. The traditional population uses very well this territory. When we are forced out of our land, we lose our traditional livelihoods."

The Munduruku have been adamantly fighting against damming the Tapajós River for over a decade. They have called on Siemens not to destroy their home. But it may not be enough.

In more recent new, two large oil spills occurred in the Peruvian Amazon since January 25th. The crude, spilled in the Loreto Department in the northeastern part of the country, has contaminated at least 30 kilometers of the Chiriaco River and has spread into Marañon River, one of the main tributaries that feed the Amazon drainage area.
Over 200 tribes were affected either by sickness or having their plantains destroyed.

I want to change this. I'm determined to make a humanitarian mission into the Amazon to do whatever I can to protect our forests and peoples. While I'm their I will speak with the indigenous people and spread the word for them, I want to learn, document and share their stories. If more news was published then more people would see how destructive this is. I will assist in rebuilding what has been lost due to deforestation and support the wildlife who lost their homes. I intend on traveling with many blank handmade books to present to the tribes I meet, and I want to encourage them to begin writing down and thus preserving their history and culture. I would assist in teaching some how to read and write, alone with any other projects that are available.

Please help. They need you. I need you to make this happen. If we work together, anything is possible!

I will be backpacking from Lima, to Cusco then to Puerto Maldonaldo where I can enter into the Southern Selva of the Amazon Basin. Here I will get a chance to shed light on what is really happening inside the rainforest.

Remember, you CAN make a difference!

Namaste ❤️
  • Peru
  • Amazonas, Peru
  • Lima, Peru
  • Cusco, Peru
  • Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Peru
  • Aguas Calientes, Cusco, Peru